1920s, Production, Consumerism, & Women


1920s, Production, Consumerism, & Women

Purpose

This lab will provide the opportunity for students to analyze causes and effects of production and consumerism by interlacing concepts and facts introduced throughout the 1920s unit. The lab is designed to be a review of information from the unit, and, therefore, students will have the most success if the lab is assigned towards the end of a unit.

This lab is created for students who have participated in a history lab a couple of times prior to this lab. The students need to be familiar with the steps/questions for analyzing an document. Students will work in pairs or groups of three while analyzing the document, but produce their own writing samples in response to central questions of their choice at the end of the lab.


 

U.S. History TEKS

(2) History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U.S. history from 1877 to the present. The student is expected to: (A) identify the major characteristics that define an historical era 

(6) History. The student understands significant events, social issues, and individuals of the 1920s. The student is expected to: (A)  analyze causes and effects of events and social issues such as the changing role of women

(16) Economics. The student understands significant economic developments between World War I and World War II. The student is expected to: (A) analyze causes of economic growth and prosperity in the 1920s, and increased production efficiencies

(23) Citizenship. The student understands efforts to expand the democratic process. The student is expected to: (B) evaluate various means of achieving equality of political rights, including the 19th,  amendments.

(26) Culture. The student understands how people from various groups contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to: (A) explain actions taken by people to expand economic opportunities and political rights, including those for women, in American society

(27) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science, technology, and the free enterprise system on the economic development of the United States. The student is expected to: (C) understand the impact of technological and management innovations and their applications in the workplace and the resulting productivity enhancements for business and labor such as assembly line manufacturing.

(28) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the influence of scientific discoveries, technological innovations, and the free enterprise system on the standard of living in the United States. The student is expected to: (A) analyze how scientific discoveries, technological innovations, and the application of these by the free enterprise system, including those in transportation and communication, improve the standard of living in the United States


 

Materials

  • One color copy of each document (suggested to keep in plastic sheet protector or laminated with cardstock)
  • Copies of the assignment sheet for students – each student will need 2-3 copies (generic form that can be used for multiple labs)
  • Students can use a textbook or unit materials (articles or assignments) throughout the lab
  • Laptops or iPads, if desired

Resources

Lib. of Cong. U.S. Govt. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://www.loc.gov/>.

 

Chamberlain, Kenneth Russell. “Revised.” Cartoon. C1917. Lib. Of Cong. 30 June 2014. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/98502833>.

 

Don’t forget her–The importance of putting your campaign with the women can not be overstressed. “American Women: a Library of Congress guide for the study of women’s history and culture in the United States.” Lib. Of Cong. C1925. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.02974>.

 

Filene, Catherine. Careers for women compiled and edited by Catherine Filene. C1920. Printed Ephemera Collection. Lib. Of Cong., Washington D.C. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.rbc/rbpe.07905000>.

 

Horydczak, Theodor. Electric Institute of Washington. Washing machine and ironer display. c1920. Photograph. Lib. Of Cong., Washington D.C. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/thc1995005101/PP>.

 

Horydczak, Theodor. Maytag Washing Maching Company. Profiler by which boring is done. c1920. Photograph. Lib. Of Cong., Washington D.C. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/thc1995000126/PP>.

 

Lib. Of Cong. “Emergence of Advertising in America: 1850-1920.” 32 Sales per clerk per hour. J. Walter Thompson Company. C1920. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.award/ncdeaa.J0089>.

 

Lib. Of Cong. “Emergence of Advertising in America: 1850-1920.” The Backward Art of Spending. J. Walter Thompson Company. C1920. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.award/ncdeaa.J0090>.

 

Lib. Of Cong. “Images of America: Lantern Slide Collection” Ford factory, first assembly line, Highland Avenue, Detroit, MI. c1913. Illustration. 30 June 2014. <http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.award/mhsalad.220102>.

 

Map of principal transportation lines of the United States. Map. United States, 1921. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://lccn.loc.gov/2007627464>.

 

Motor Transport Corps training school Earn while you learn. C1919. Chromolithograph. Lib. Of Cong., Washington D.C. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. < http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/00651837 >.

 

Palmer, Alfred T. Blitz buggies. Finished motors on the conveyor line, which is taking them to the assembly point in the plant. This conveyor line is part of a conveyor system 135 miles long throughout the plant. Ford River Rouge plant . c1941. Photograph. Lib. Of Cong., Washington D.C. Lib of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/oem2002000655/PP>.

 

Perrysburg journal [Perrysburg, Ohio] 21 March 1918. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076843/1918-03-21/ed-1/seq-8>.

 

Photograph. Lib. Of Cong., Washington D.C. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://loc.gov/rr/mss/guide/ms011008.jpg>.

 

Touring map of the Custer Battlefield Hiway: the scenic route to the west. Map. Northwestern States, 1925. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. < http://lccn.loc.gov/99466708 >.

 

Western Motor Car Route Guide. Map. Pacific States, 1915. Lib. Of Cong. Web. 30 June 2014. <http://lccn.loc.gov/99446217>.

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Guiding Questions


How did the assembly line contribute to the increase of prosperity and consumerism during the 1920s?

What effect did advertising have on the roles of women throughout the 1920s?